Posted in
03/01/19
celine eisele

Compassion goes hand-in-hand with excellent clinical care, and Celine Eisele, a registered nurse in Peninsula Regional Medical Center’s Intensive Care Unit, is the perfect example of this.

A patient’s family member nominated her, saying, “My family will forever be grateful for Celine Eisele. From the beginning of her time as my grandmother’s nurse, she treated us with the utmost respect and care while serving as my grandmother's advocate and caregiver. During the week, in the midst of my grandmother's illness, I showed Celine a picture of my grandmother when she was well. The next morning, Celine had done her best to wash my grandmother's hair and fixed it the best she could to look like normal. Just that little act of kindness brought tears to my eyes. On the day my grandmother passed away, Celine was not her nurse, but made a point to check in from time to time. She prepared us for what was to come and stood by us during the most difficult times. As I left that day, she hugged me one final time. With tears in her eyes, she offered her condolences to us. This wasn't a show. This wasn't just a job. This is her passion. Families of ICU patients are going through the most difficult times. Their hope is hanging on by a thread, their fears are real, their bodies are simply going through the motions. But nurses like Celine make this tolerable. They made the difficult days easier. I will never, ever forget Celine Eisele. As long as I live, I will be indebted to her.”

Eisele was honored with the Daisy Award in a ceremony before her colleagues. She received a certificate commending her for being an extraordinary nurse. The certificate reads: “In deep appreciation of all you do, who you are, and the incredibly meaningful difference you make in the lives of so many people.” She was also presented with fresh flowers on behalf of the Peninsula Regional Medical staff, and a sculpture called A Healer’s Touch, hand-carved by artists of the Shona Tribe in Zimbabwe.  To nominate an exceptional nurse, visit www.peninsula.org/DaisyAward and share a story.

The not-for-profit DAISY Foundation is based in Glen Ellen, CA, and was established by family members in memory of J. Patrick Barnes.  Patrick died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little-known but not uncommon auto-immune disease.  The care Patrick and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families.

President and Co-Founder of The DAISY Foundation Bonnie Barnes said, “When Patrick was critically ill, our family experienced firsthand the remarkable skill and care nurses provide patients every day and night. Yet these unsung heroes are seldom recognized for the super-human work they do. The kind of work the nurses at PRMC are called on to do every day epitomizes the purpose of The DAISY Award.”