Posted in
11/11/14
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Susan Drummond, RN, left, and Joy Knauer, RN, are the recipients of the November/December Daisy Award for Extraordinary Nurses.

Teamwork can be an important part of good nursing care – especially when the patient can feel like part of the team. A patient at Peninsula Regional Medical Center’s Medical Infusion department nominated her two infusion nurses, Susan Drummond, RN, and Joy Knauer, RN, for the Daisy Award for Extraordinary Nurses for getting to know her and for making her frequent visits special. “Susan and Joy are the two faces I see each month as I go for my infusions,” the nominator wrote. “Although I dread my procedures and wish I could be anywhere else, I always know I will be treated with extra kindness and made to feel very special. Last summer, my infusion day just happened to fall on my birthday,” their nominator wrote. “When I arrived and pulled back the curtain to my cubicle, it was decorated with Happy Birthday banners and there was even a cupcake with a candle in it!” She said the nurses always bring her favorite cookies – Lorna Doone shortbreads – to snack on while she undergoes her infusion; they have gotten to know her as a person and treat her as more than just another patient – although, she noted, they show the same exceptional kindness to all of their patients. “These two ladies epitomize what it means to be a nurse, but they have learned more than what books teach. They have learned the art of caring and compassion for their patients.” Drummond and Knauer were honored with the Daisy Award in a ceremony before their colleagues, as well as their nominating patient and family. They received a certificate commending them for being extraordinary nurses. The certificate reads: “In deep appreciation of all you do, who you are, and the incredibly meaningful difference you make in the lives of so many people.” They were also given fresh daisies, and a sculpture called A Healer’s Touch, hand-carved by artists of the Shona Tribe in Zimbabwe. To nominate an exceptional nurse, visit www.peninsula.org/DaisyAward and share a story. “We are proud to be among the hospitals participating in the Daisy Award program. Nurses are heroes every day,” said PRMC Chief Nursing Officer Mary Beth D’Amico. “It’s important that our nurses know their work is highly valued.” The not-for-profit DAISY Foundation is based in Glen Ellen, CA, and was established by family members in memory of J. Patrick Barnes. Patrick died at the age of 33 in late 1999 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a little-known but not uncommon auto-immune disease. The care Patrick and his family received from nurses while he was ill inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patient families. President and Co-Founder of The DAISY Foundation Bonnie Barnes said, “When Patrick was critically ill, our family experienced firsthand the remarkable skill and care nurses provide patients every day and night. Yet these unsung heroes are seldom recognized for the super-human work they do. The kind of work the nurses at PRMC are called on to do every day epitomizes the purpose of The DAISY Award.”